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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
the fears of progressives as obama conducts a foreign policy that looks like bush's. i am not pro-drone. i am pro-destroying al qaeda. i am pro-protecting america. i am pro-a better drone program and i am pro ending this war as soon as we can but i fear that's a long way away. as douglas macarthur said, only the dead have seen the end of war, and we may now be in a permanent war. okay. that does it for "the cycle." martin, it's yours. >> passionate patriotism from toure. thank you. it's monday, february 11th, and a pope has abdicated, the president prepares to face the nation, but republicans are still stuck on benghazi. >> the president's state of the union address. could be the president's last best chance to address a captive audience. >> do republicans have the leverage now? >> none of the things i ran on as part of the tea party have been fixed. >> i don't want to live with this sequester. >> how do we get growth with jobs? >> no confirmation without information. >> are you going to support him for defense secretary? >> i will see the rest of the answers to his questions but certainly
back to the election" rather than the point of view he has about foreign policy. >> we don't agree on very much in terms of foreign policy. when i think about the national security team that led to my comment that i thought the president was making second-rate choices, that goes to things like hagel for defense, susan rice to state, brennan for c.i.a.. >> brennan worked closely, was in the c.i.a. >> john was around when we were there. he didn't play a prominent role. that's really developed since he joined this administration. >> rose: but there are -- >> but there are people that could be appoint as director of c.i.a. folks like steve cap pass. i don't know if you know him? >> rose: i know him very well. >> talented guy, enormously respected. >> rose: retired from the c.i.a.. >> he has retired. they brought him back once before, we did. with people of that caliber available, i'm surprised you end up going with somebody like brennan. i just -- i come back to the proposition that it looks to me-- and speculative on my part, obviously, i'm not in the meetings-- that the president has
, immigration, the environment, everything basically, but his lead on foreign policy is a staggering 14 points. what makes republicans think this is a good thing to have a fight over? >> right. up until recently everybody said, look, politics stops at the water's edge, and that hasn't been the case for the last couple years with this republican party. but it turns out that it wasn't necessarily that both parties followed that axiom because they were being nice about it. it turns out that it's incredibly bad politics to challenge your sitting president overseas. and, you know, this benghazi thing has not worked out for the republican party at all. they tried effectively to make it the biggest issue of the presidential campaign in the last several weeks, and people just didn't buy into it. what they saw is a tragedy. something that was -- if it could have been prevented, it should have been prevented, but they weren't going to start pointing blame and ask for the resignations of hillary clinton and throw barack obama out of office. >> right. >> and the idea that you'd be able to stop future cia
have pioneered a more nimbler, more effective approach to foreign policy. i am enormously proud of what we have achieved. i am confident about the future, having left the state department in the capable hands of secretary john kerry, himself an accomplished diplomat and decorated navy veteran. i believe that we have established a strong base for this kind of collaboration, which i think is essential going forward against the challenges and threats we face. i happen to have grown up in a navy household. during world war ii, my pother was chief petty officer, trained sailors -- training sailors. he never forgot and used to tell us how it felt when it was like watching the young men getting loaded onto troop trains, killing many would never return home. after he died many years later i received an outpouring of letters and photographs from some of the men he had trained at surt and returned home and build lives and families of the run. i could not believe that that experience, getting yelled at by my father, was so formative for them. i was glad to hear it, frankly. i saw this same sense o
security foreign and development policies in an era of dynamic shifts and global affairs, a smart power approach. she led efforts in alliances and engaged emerging powers and develop new partnerships to advance american interest on security, and values. her sound counsel and steady hand guided the united states response to the global economic crisis. and the ever world and new opportunities and challenges in asia. she provided leadership in iraq and afghanistan during a security transition in those countries. her transformative leadership elevated the role as able partners for addressing the growing spectrum of security challenges and forge a strong relationship with the department of defense. her accomplishments reflect great art upon herself, the department of state, and the united states government. [applause] >> coats thank you, secretary panetta. ladies and gentlemen, the 67 secretary of state, hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> thank you. this is certainly a memorable valentine's day. it is such an honor and personal privilege for me to be here with people whom i admire, respec
"foreign policy magazine" my position right now is that i want an answer to the question. that question totally unrelated to chuck hagel as defense secretary is what president obama was doing during the benghazi attack. hagel remains in limbo, as does defense secretary leon panetta, who isn't exactly sure when he will be able to return to his california walnut groves. >> this is, i believe, my final press conference here at the pentagon briefing room. there are moments when i thought i was part of the last act of an italian opera. you're not sure exactly when it would end, and when the fat lady would sing. >> for now the only certainty is much more congressional uncertainty. joy, does leon panetta need a shirt that says "i survived a chuck hagel filibuster and all i got was this lousy t-shirt?" just when he thinks it can't get worse, it's actually seemingly gotten worse. >> this is insane. i mean, last night i went through, and i was looking at the george w. bush cabinet nominations. none of which were filibustered. just for fun. just because i knew we were talking about it. his second
administration. it was very nice of him to bring up foreign policy, because in fact he has not been transparent at all about his drone war or his kill list or any of the other things that have to be leaked for us to find out about. we still don't know what he was doing the night of the attack in benghazi. not just the night of the attack in benghazi but also the night on the attack on the cairo embassy and other embassies in the middle east. if he is transparent, you know, this is sort of basic information that he should provide. >> bret: so you agree that for these senators to say hey, we need this information, it's okay for them to hold up even national security cabinet position for some time to get it. >> the president should be given extreme deference in appointing his members of his cabinet. the way john bolton was treated was terrible. i said that at the time. i think there has to be a real reason. in this situation, i think he will be confirmed but it is sad that lindsey graham has the hold up a nomination to find out where the president was the night of the terrorist attack. i mean some
't think we will hear a lot about foreign policy tonight. we will hear about the president trying to pull troops out of afghanistan. and we will probably hear about north korea, since that happened today. that might change things a little. i think there will be a good number of things that he will not mention, which is interesting. guest: i have never observed a pattern of wars beginning in conjunction with state of the union addresses. one thing i will watch for this evening is the congressional black caucus. a collection of black members of congress met recently with valerie jarrett on the hill -- she's one of the president's top advisers -- to discuss the state of the union to some extent. the question i have is whether he is going to address black unemployment specifically and things that will help bring that number down. i think that is what the congressional black caucus wants, but i don't know if that is what he's going to do. host: we're talking with anita kumar and jonathan strong. anita kumar is a white house correspondent from mcclatchy newspapers. host: congressional reporter
by the hillary clinton president for. 3:00 a.m. every president faces a foreign policy crisis. do you want this man, senator barack obama answering that phone call at 3:00 a.m.? well, it turns out, suddenly a relevant question. >> suddenly a relevant question because on the afternoon of september 11th, 2012, of course the day of the benghazi attacks that unfolded, there was some question now at least being raised by republican congressman louie gohmert as to why -- how responsive was the president during this entire time? well, we know in the afternoon he did speak with his. >> leon panetta and general demps is i. >> 5:00 p.m. in the afternoon. louie gohmert raising this point 3:00 a.m. and whether or not he was able to sleep through all of these unfolding problems in benghazi, listen. >> president required a sleep aid that night but if he did, anybody else in america has trouble sleeping, you better get what he had because it works well. how the president of the united states could sleep that night as the ambassador that he put in place, that he put in harm's way was under attack or he ha
the answer, i don't know. i don't develop the programs, i don't develop policy, i don't do foreign policy or military policy or military objectives. once congress and the executive branch decide what the policy or program is, then we see how well it's done and if there are problems, we make recommendations. going back to the taxation issue, it's a critical issue. now the afghan government, what they collect is about $2 billion per year. just paying for the afghan national security force is over $4 billion. then all the other programs. the problem is there's a delta between what the afghans collect and it cost of running their government, the cost of fighting the taliban, the cost of maintaining order. that difference is being supported by the united states taxpayer and by our allies. but it is conditioned. the caller and others have some concerns about how well that is being spent. that is the value. a lot of discussion came out of the tokyo accords about the international community will not walk, but they're trying to put conditions on the ability of the afghan government to govern and t
very well. that's about him. but do they like the president's foreign policy? no. so these things kind of blend but generally you could say that for national security republicans, these two nominees, brennan on drones, for example, the use of drones, these nominees become proxies for policies they either question or they don't like. >> and moving forward, we're moving into this second term and the kind of makeup of congress is relatively speaking the same. how much do you think this will impact this hold on nominees, impact the relationship between republicans and democrats? it it can't get much worse. >> the white house isn't happy over hagel. they believe it's petty to hold him up when they believe he's going to eventually get confirmed. so they are not happy about it. republicans need to work with the white house on issues like immigration, for example, will this make for bad blood? yes. will it hold up immigration reform if it's in the interest of both parties to do it, probably not. i think the person who gets affected by this, quite honestly, is chuck hagel himself because he's g
effective approach to foreign policy. so i am enormously proud of what we have achieved and i'm confident about the future having left the state department in capable hands of secretary john kerry, himself an accomplished diplomat decorated navy veteran. so i believe we have established a strong base for this kind of collaboration, which i think is essential and going forward against the challenges and threats that we face. i have been of growing up in a navy household. during world war ii, my father is a chief petty up sir, training soldiers before they were picked up to the pacific. he sits on my brothers and me how i felt watching this young man get loaded knowing that many would never return home. after he died, many years later, i received an outpouring of letters and photographs are men he trained, who is served and returned home in the lives and families of their own. i just couldn't believe that experience, being yelled at them i thought there so four-minute for a time when i was glad to hear it, frankly. i saw this same sense of dedication and duty when i first lady and senator f
to burnish his foreign policy credentials. 2016 though a long ways away but there will be a lot of attention paid to this trip, craig, because there is so much speculation whether or not rubio is going to throw his hat into the ring in 2016. >> kristen welker frequently draws the short straw, good to see you, thank you. >> reporter: all the tough assignments, thanks, craig. >>> feel like you need a vacation? so do your lawmakers aparentally. thursday republicans blocked voting former nebraska senator chuck hagel into the defense post he's nominated for in president obama's cabinet and yesterday they left town for nine days. joining me now jake sherman, congressional reporter, molly bald, national political reporter at "the atlantic." molly, today's "new york times" california democrat barbara boxer likened the block that republicans like texas senator ted cruz have put on chuck hagel to mccarthyism. what was the point of prolonging this hagel vote until after everyone reconvenes? >> well, i think that republicans started out with some legitimate questions about this, and they would say they'
certainly want better trade policies. i want more support and subsidies for american manufacturers rather than for foreign manufacturers but you can make sure the federal government is being a good steward of taxpayer dollars and using them to buy for from americans rather than foreign companies. host: 1 last tweet -- guest: you will never stop everyone from buying an illegal gun. that is always the case with laws we pass. if you want laws the one that% air tight, we should not pass anything. we're trying to cut down on the number of illegal sales oe
need to be calm and collected a lonely job of the strategy to have a genuine common foreign -- when we draw up the strategy to have a genuine common for policy. it is time to put an end to splitting up our resources and bring them together. there are conflicts which undermine confidence in humanity. it stopped nuclear proliferation to put forward negotiations. the time has come for that as well. it needs to be present. " europe has a role to play when it comes to be clients. we cannot act alone. your knees to set an example when it comes to energy of -- europe me to set an example when it comes to energy efficiencies. i believe europe is useful and good not just for europeans before the whole planet. the best way for europe to protect its own it interest is to protect its values are of the world. we need to come back to what the project is all about. it is a political project based on values and the knowledge, ideas, works of art, culture comic creativity. it is constantly reminding ourselves that we can be able to be up to the level of our past and maybe help on new generations to com
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)